Security increased at UH Ahuja Fertility Center after egg, embryo freezer malfunction

by Frankie Norman March 11, 2018, 1:01
Security increased at UH Ahuja Fertility Center after egg, embryo freezer malfunction

"We are so very sorry this happened, and we want to do all that we can to support our patients and families through this very hard time", DePompei said. The frozen eggs and embryos play a crucial part in the whole process, but they have to be stored in certain conditions and at certain temperatures to remain viable.

The fertility center apologized for the mistake and said it plans to investigate how it happened.

Samples would have to be thawed to determine whether they've been damaged.

The facility has set up a call center for patients to arrange and appointment or calls to speak with their physicians.

University Hospitals notified the patients this week, explaining that a problem with one of two large freezers preserving the specimens at the hospital's fertility center was discovered last Sunday, the Cleveland Plain Dealer reported. Removing and freezing a woman's eggs, for instance, can cost more than $10,000, on top of which, patients also pay annual storage fees.

According to University Hospitals, none of the eggs and embryos impacted by the partial thaw will be destroyed.

University Clinic adds that it plans on doing the right thing by its patients and their families, but doesn't go into detail as to what that would entail.

"Some of the eggs and embryos that were stored date back decades and people move, their addresses change but we've made our best attempts to track down everyone that we can", DePompei said. These eggs are watched over using a video surveillance and an alarm system. "And we want to do all that we can to support our patients and families through this hard time", said the clinic. The line is staffed by nurse professionals from 7 a.m.to 8 p.m. Monday to Friday, and 8 a.m.to 1 p.m. on Saturday.

Over the weekend, a malfunction caused the temperature to rise in a storage bank at the University Hospitals Ahuja Medical Center. The only way to know if they are still viable is to implant them says the hospital.

This is a representational image showing a technician opening a vessel containing women's frozen egg cells in Amsterdam, April 6, 2011. The cost of the procedure range from at least $12,000 to $14,000.


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