Apple to go green, use only 100% recycled materials

by Lawrence Cooper April 24, 2017, 2:32
Apple to go green, use only 100% recycled materials

Considering the expansive work Apple has done regarding recycling and sustainability efforts - especially in comparison to their technological company counterparts - you may be surprised to learn that the fruit nonetheless pulls many rare-earth metals and toxins from the ground to make a slew of products including iPhones, iPads, Macbooks, and other Apple accessories. Other investigations into the company's practices, however, haven't been so rosy.

Apple is also encouraging its suppliers and partners to operate on renewable energy, with seven of its major suppliers already pledging to use 100 per cent renewable energy to power the manufacturing of their Apple products by the end of this year.

Now the company aims to pivot toward investing in a closed-loop supply chain where products are made only from recycled or renewable materials.

Apple's long-term concept for a recyclable product.

"We are also challenging ourselves to one day end our reliance on mining altogether". That's an ambitious goal.

Apple announced it is transitioning to 100% recycled tin on the main logic board of the iPhone 6s, while also using reclaimed aluminium to build new devices.

Right now, numerous elements of Apple's electronic devices require rare materials often found in conflict areas that pose both environmental and human risks. She hopes the announcement will send a message to mining companies that Apple is looking for recycled materials-perhaps prompting some of them to pivot their focus.

Despite these successes, Apple admits that there is still a long way to go.

In the third video titled 'Why does Apple make its own sweat? It is a long-term project of the company and we have to salute them for it. Apple's new Earth Day Challenge urges clients to get outside and appreciate the planet and finish an exercise of no less than 30 minutes.

There are multiple problems with this approach. Previous year the company unveiled Liam, a robot that disassembles old phones so their parts can be reused. Funding from such activities could actually help pay for more recycling - a recent USA Today story dove into how falling prices for recycled stock material have put the crunch on recycling companies. At last check, they've reached 99 per cent recycled/responsibly sourced materials in their product packaging and also working towards counting exclusively on renewable energy to power their work (100% for data centres and 96% for worldwide facilities if you want specifics).


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