Phoenix mom deported after routine immigration check

by Abel Hampton February 10, 2017, 1:42
Phoenix mom deported after routine immigration check

An Arizona mother who left Mexico and entered the United States illegally when she was 14-years-old has been detained and might be one of the first people deported since President Trump's executive order on immigration and border security went into effect.

The protest surged at the Immigration and Customs Enforcement facility after Guadalupe Garcia de Rayos was taken into custody during a routine check-in with the agency, according to media reports. The legality of the raids was upheld in court following a civil rights class action filed by Puente Arizona, a human rights group, but Arpaio disbanded the unit.

Rayos' family confirmed that she was deported to Nogales, Mexico, on Thursday. She had been required to check in yearly with ICE, and she did so this year despite the fear she could be deported under stricter immigration rules, The New York Times reported.

Rayos is facing deportation as part of President Donald Trump's recent executive order focused on removing undocumented immigrants with a history of arrests, according to her attorney.

Garcia de Rayos pleaded guilty in March 2009 to a reduced charge of criminal impersonation and was sentenced to two years of probation. Garcia de Rayos didn't fit that criteria, he said, which is why she was allowed to stay in the US.

In a statement, ICE said Rayos' removal was finalized by the Department of Justice in May 2013. At least 7 people were arrested for blocking the vehicle, Phoenix Police said on Twitter.

The deportation of Garcia de Rayos came days after the Trump administration broadened regulations under which some people will be deported. She was charged for using a fake Social Security number in order to work.

Rabin told ABC News that such check-ins were "very common" for certain undocumented immigrants during the previous administration, including Garcia, who has a previous conviction for a non-violent offense.

But Wednesday evening when Rayos went in for her meeting, she was arrested and deportation proceedings were begun.

Five years later, a judge is believed to have ruled that she had no legal standing to remain in the United States, but was allowed to stay on appeal, with regular check-ins.

But on January 25, Trump issued an executive order that instructed the secretary of homeland security to "prioritize for removal" anyone in the country illegally who has been convicted of, or even just charged with, any criminal offense. She had not returned to her birth country since she was 14-years-old, and has spent the majority of her life in the U.S.

Activists blocked the gates surrounding the office for around an hour as they chanted trying to protect Guadalupe Garcia de Rayos. "Today, under Trump's administration, this is what's going on".


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